DRAGON Luftwaffe day fighter, Battle of Britain (ground crew and equipment set) - 5032 1:48 SCALE

DRAGON

DRAGON Luftwaffe day fighter, Battle of Britain (ground crew and equipment set) - 5032 1:48 SCALE

The Luftwaffe is a German air force that began to form in February 1935 under a special order from the Nazi dictator of Germany - Adolf Hitler. The commander of the Luftwaffe - from its inception, until the end of the Second World War - was Herman Göring. The quantitative development of German aviation in the period 1935-1939 was rapid, and at that time it was equipped with machines that actually served until the end of the war, including the Me-109 fighter, Ju-87 Stukas dive bombers or bombers mediums like the He-111 or Ju-88. Some German pilots also gained combat experience while serving as part of the Condor Legion during the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939). Furthermore, even before the war, the Luftwaffe was oriented in such a way that it could support the operations of the ground forces as effectively as possible. This was reflected in its equipment, structure and organization, as well as in the training of pilots. The German air force emerged successfully from campaigns in Poland, Norway and France, with the Luftwaffe suffering relatively heavy losses in the latter campaign, both in aircraft and personnel. On the other hand, a very painful lesson was the Battle of Britain, during which it suffered a decisive defeat, losing many more planes, and especially well-trained pilots, than the enemy. It can be added, among other things, that Adolf Galland was one of the best fighter pilots of the Luftwaffe during this battle. During the fighting on the Eastern Front (1941-1945), the German Air Force, especially at the beginning of the conflict, dominated the quality of aircraft and the training of crews and pilots, which resulted in horrendous aviation losses Soviet and led to even fantastic results in shooting down German fighter aces, such as Hermann Graf or Walter Nowotny. However, in the years 1942-1943 the balance of victory in the air war over Europe began to tip towards the Soviet and - above all - allied aviation, which, thanks to machines such as the latest versions of the Spitfire or the P- 51 Mustang, caused more and more losses to the German Luftwaffe, also during the fighting over Germany and during strategic bombings. Even the Luftwaffe's efforts to make a qualitative leap by introducing jet machines such as the Me-262 or Ar-234 into line in 1944-1945 brought no effect, and the increasingly less trained German pilots suffered increasing losses in the clash with the allied machines. It is assumed that from the beginning of the war to January 1945, Luftwaffe personnel losses amounted to approximately 140,000. people killed and about 155 thousand. missing people.
TAMIYA WWII RUSSIAN INFANTRY AND TANK CREW SET – 32521 SCALA 1:48

TAMIYA

TAMIYA WWII RUSSIAN INFANTRY AND TANK CREW SET – 32521 SCALA 1:48

In the 1920s and – especially – the 1930s, the Red Army experienced rapid development in terms of increasing its assignments, as well as increasing saturation with technical weapons, mainly armored weapons. However, the infantry was the main and numerically largest element of the Red Army. Intense quantitative development of this type of weapon began at the turn of 1929 and 1930. In 1939, even before the aggression against Poland, the Soviet infantry was formed into 173 divisions (the so-called rifle divisions), most of which they were grouped into 43 bodies. It is worth adding that after the September campaign of 1939, this number increased even more. The Soviet rifle division in 1941 consisted of three rifle regiments (three battalions each), an artillery regiment, after a division of anti-tank and anti-aircraft artillery, as well as reconnaissance and communication battalions. In total it numbered around 14,500 people. However, in 1945, this position underwent significant changes, leading to a division of approximately 11,500–12,000 personnel, consisting of three infantry regiments, an artillery brigade consisting of three regiments, a self-propelled artillery squadron and many support units, including including anti-tanks, anti-aircraft weapons and communications. The saturation of infantry units with machine guns also increased significantly, for example with the APsZ 41 and later APsZ 43 submachine guns. Armored and mechanized troops of the Red Army began to form on a larger scale in the late 1920s It's 30's. Especially in the 1930s they developed dynamically. This was reflected in both the organizational structure and equipment. On the first of these aircraft, the formation of mechanized corps began in 1932, the structure of which developed until the outbreak of the Second World War. As for equipment, new types of tanks were introduced, such as the BT-5, BT-7, T-26 and the T-28 multi-turret tank. Even very successful tanks came into line shortly before the start of the war with the Third Reich - of course, we are talking about the KW-1 and T-34. However, despite the fact that at the time of the German aggression the Soviet armored forces had a quantitative advantage over the aggressor, they suffered huge losses of men and equipment in the first period of the war. They can be explained by the deficiencies of well-trained officer cadres (after the Stalinist purges of the 1930s), the inferior individual training of Soviet tankers compared to their German adversaries, or the inferior tactics used by Soviet tank crews. Furthermore, the doctrine of their use was not as consistent and well-founded in training as in the German army. We can also add to this the rather poor ergonomics of Soviet vehicles or the shortage of short- and long-range radio stations in the armed forces. Over time, however, these errors began to be corrected more or less successfully. For example - from the spring of 1942, armored armies began to form, which were supposed to perform mainly offensive tasks and which constituted a slightly more ergonomic structure than the previous mechanized corps. However, it seems reasonable to say that until the end of the war, the Red Army emphasized quantitative advantage rather than qualitative advantage over the enemy, although it introduced successful tanks such as the T-34/85 or the IS- 2 during the war. This is clearly visible, for example, during the Battle of Kursk in July 1943.
TAMIYA US 2 1/2-TON 6X6 CARGO TRUCK – 32548 SCALA 1:48

TAMIYA

TAMIYA US 2 1/2-TON 6X6 CARGO TRUCK – 32548 SCALA 1:48

The term 2,5-ton, 6x6 truck (colloquially: two-and-a-half) refers to the entire family of medium trucks used by the U.S. military during World War II, but also on a large scale during the Cold War. This family of trucks was designed and manufactured in the early 1940s for the US Army as a basic 5,000 pound (2.5 "short" or 2.3 metric) heavy-duty truck on terrain and in all weather conditions. From the beginning it was thought that this type of car would be simple in design and that their production would be mass-produced. During World War II, a total of more than 700,000 trucks of this type were created, notably by GMC (model CCKW) and Studebaker. Many of these vehicles found their way to the USSR under the Lend-and-Lease program. The families of these trucks played a gigantic role in the logistics and transportation of Allied and Soviet troops during