THE SUPERB HELLER 1/150

HELLER

THE SUPERB HELLER 1/150

THE SUPERB HELLER 1/150 867 PIECE PLASTIC KIT. Le Superbe was a French ocean liner of the late 18th century. The unit was launched in 1784. The ship was built in a shipyard in the city of Brest in France. The vessel was 56 m long and 14.9 m wide. Her displacement was about 1950 tons. The vessel was armed with 74 deck guns. Le Superbe was created in connection with the desire to strengthen the French fleet after the end of the US War of Independence in 1775-1783. The new unit was based on the plans of Jacques Noel Sane. The unit received a copper sheet fitting on the hull, which on the one hand improved its performance and on the other hand had a very positive effect on extending the life of the hull. This practice almost became a rule in the French fleet in the 1770s. Despite good bravery at sea and good performance, the unit did not have a long combat career, as it sank on January 30, 1795 in a storm.
M.A.S. 563/568 WITH CREW ITALERI 1:35

ITALERI

M.A.S. 563/568 WITH CREW ITALERI 1:35

MAS 563/568 WITH CREW Description CONTAINS 6 FIGURINES - PHOTO-ETCHED - TRANSPARENT ACETATE - SCREWS, ROPES & ACCESSORIES Since the First World War, the Royal Italian Navy has paid great attention to the development of small and fast boats generally armed with torpedoes. Torpedo armed speedboats, better known by the acronym MAS, were boats of direct civilian origin. During the First World War the results obtained were absolutely significant with the sinking, by Commander Luigi Rizzo, of the battleships of the Austro-Hungarian Navy Wien and Szent István. Although they were suitable for closed and smooth seas such as the Adriatic, the Italian Navy continued to work to improve the performance of the small but fast torpedo boats. The MAS 500s, equipped with the new, more powerful and reliable Isotta-Fraschini petrol engines, built during the Second World War, were used both as torpedo boats and as anti-submarine platforms for dropping depth charges. They could reach a maximum speed of 45 knots and were armed with two 450 mm torpedoes. ITALERI SCALE 1:35
TITANIC ( the white star liner) ACADEMY 1:400

ACADEMY

TITANIC ( the white star liner) ACADEMY 1:400

TITANIC (the white star liner) pre-coloured plastic,. ACADEMY 1:400 The RMS Titanic is a British ocean liner built for the White Star Line shipping company. The launch took place on 30 May 1911 at the Harland and Wolff shipyard. Hailed as a marvel of marine engineering, the Titanic was considered unsinkable. This legend proved false on its maiden voyage, when the ship struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic and sank along with approximately 1,500 people on the night of April 14-15, 1912. It was one of the most spectacular maritime disasters of the 20th century. Technical data: displacement (full): 46300 t, length: 269 m, width: 29.41 m, draft: 10.5 m, maximum speed: 24 w, crew: 892 people and 1324 passengers.
Italeri 5623 M.T.M. Barchino with crew SCALA 1:35

ITALERI

Italeri 5623 M.T.M. Barchino with crew SCALA 1:35

Italeri 5623 MTM Barchino with crew 1:35 SCALE. The Royal Italian Navy, thanks to the successes achieved during the First World War, developed various underwater and surface assault vehicles. The Modified Touring Motorboat (MTM) was designed to ensure a rapid approach to the target to be struck and not easily identifiable by enemy forces. Once the approach was completed and the target was close, the pilot blocked the rudder to stay on course and launched the small boat at high speed against it. The pilot, positioned at the stern, ejected from the punt at a safe distance, before the collision. The high explosive charge positioned at the bow of the Barchino detonated upon impact with the target. We can remember the sinking, by the assault group commanded by Luigi Faggioni, of the British Royal Navy heavy cruiser HMS York at Suda in March 1941, as the most successful action of the Italian Royal Navy in the use of the “Punt”.
Revell 05078 Deutsches U-Boot German Submarine Type XXI with Interior Scala 1/144

REVELL

Revell 05078 Deutsches U-Boot German Submarine Type XXI with Interior Scala 1/144

Revell 05078 Deutsches U-Boot German Submarine Type XXI with Interior Scale 1/144. The Type XXI U-boats were German ocean-going submarines whose serial production began in 1944. The Type XXI units were 76.7 m long, 6.6 m wide and had an underwater displacement of 1,820 tons. The maximum speed on the surface of the Type XXI U-boats was 15.6 knots, and the maximum speed underwater was 17.2 knots! The main armament of the Type XXI units consisted of six 533 mm torpedo tubes located in the bow. Secondary armament is 2 twin 20mm AA guns or 2 twin 30mm AA guns. The Type XXI U-boats were created in connection with the increasing losses suffered by German submarines in the Battle of the Atlantic, linked to the use of increasingly sophisticated methods by the Western Allies (Combating Submarines). The command of the Kriegsmarine in 1943 decided to create a completely new type of submarine, which turned out to be a technological breakthrough in the construction of this type of unit. First, a large-scale modular structure was used, which significantly reduced the production time of a single vessel. Furthermore, a new type of propulsion was used and a much better hydrodynamic shape of the hull and kiosk was taken care of, which allowed the phenomenal underwater speed of 17 knots for those times! The Type XXI ships also had a long range, a very large maximum depth, and were much quieter than previous German submarines. They also had rich - as at the end of the Second World War - electronic equipment. All these qualities made them an extremely dangerous weapon against Allied merchant shipping in the Atlantic. However, considerable production delays, the Western Allies' offensive bombing of Germany, and the loss of Atlantic ports in 1944 meant that the first Type XXI ships did not enter operational service until March 1945! However, after the end of the Second World War, the acquired copies were intensively studied by the Americans, British and Russians and, to a large extent, marked the development of submarines in these countries until the end of the 1950s!
MIKRO-MIR CB CLASS MIDGET SUBMARINES – 72-026 SCALA 1:72

MIKRO-MIR

MIKRO-MIR CB CLASS MIDGET SUBMARINES – 72-026 SCALA 1:72

CA is the name of a class of Italian World War II miniature diesel-electric submarines. Ships of this type were launched in 1938-1941. In total only 4 ships of this type were built. The CA-class ship was 10 meters long, 1.96 meters wide and had a displacement of only 16.4 tonnes. The maximum speed underwater was up to 5 knots. Ships of this type could be armed with two 450 mm torpedoes. The CA-class ships were initially designed and built as ultra-light coastal submarines. However, during World War II, they were modified for various types of special missions requiring advanced stealth. Even their construction by the Caproni company was kept secret. In 1942 and 1943 it was planned that units of this type would be transported across the Atlantic aboard the submarine Leonardo Da Vinci and launch an attack on American ships moored in New York. Interestingly, the ship even underwent proper modernization, but in May 1943 it sank, and the imminent signing of the ceasefire by Italy made the implementation of this plan impossible. All CA-class ships were scrapped in 1943 and 1944.
ICM U-BOAT TYPE IIB (1943) GERMAN SUBMARINE – S.010 SCALA 1:144

ICM

ICM U-BOAT TYPE IIB (1943) GERMAN SUBMARINE – S.010 SCALA 1:144

Type II U-boats were German submarines whose construction began in 1934. Depending on the subtype, Type II units had a length of 41 m to 44 m, a width of 4.08 m to 4.92 m and an underwater displacement - from 303 tons to 364 tons. The maximum speed on the surface of the Type II U-boats was about 13 knots, and the maximum speed underwater was about 7 knots. The main armament consisted of 3 533 mm torpedo tubes, all in the bow, with a total of 5 torpedoes or 18 mines carried on board the ship. Secondary armament is 1 x 20 mm AA gun. This type of ship was built mainly in the Kiel and Lübeck shipyards. The Type II U-boats were the first submarines built for the German Navy after 1918. In its general assumptions, it was very clearly modeled on the ship built for Finland called "Vessiko". They were consciously treated as ships that were supposed to provide the German shipbuilding industry with the appropriate qualifications for the mass production of new types of submarines with increased combat capabilities. Therefore, Type II U-boats were intended for training and coastal defense duties. They also had many disadvantages: a very limited range, a slow descent process and a low speed under water. During World War II, they were used mainly in the Baltic and the North Sea, and to a small extent - after capsizing the Danube - also in the Black Sea.
Italeri 5609 Biber Midget Submarine Scala 1/35

ITALERI

Italeri 5609 Biber Midget Submarine Scala 1/35

Italeri 5609 Biber Midget Submarine Scale 1/35. Plastic kit, glue and colors not included. DECAL FOR 3 VERSIONS - COLOR INSTRUCTION SHEET - PHOTO-ETCHED CONTAINS 2 FIGURES The "Biber" was the best-known "pocket" submarine used during the end of the Second World War by the Kriegsmarine. The development of the Biber was extremely rapid. Design began in February 1944 and the first examples took to sea only 6 months later. Just 9 meters long, it had a range of 240 km. It could reach a maximum speed of 6.5 knots when surfacing and 5.3 knots when submerged. The Biber could be armed with two 530 mm torpedoes, mounted externally to the submarine, or with two mines. Its crew consisted of only one person. The use of the Biber, within the Kriegsmarine strategy, was very simple: to provide a concrete defense along the coasts to protect against a possible, and increasingly probable, Allied invasion. From 1944 until the end of World War II, the Kriegsmarine received and put into operation more than 300 Bibers.
Hasegawa HP001 Soya Antarctica Observation Ship 2nd Corps. Scala 1/250

HASEGAWA

Hasegawa HP001 Soya Antarctica Observation Ship 2nd Corps. Scala 1/250

Hasegawa HP001 Soya Antarctica Observation Ship 2nd Corps. Scale 1/250. The Soya was a Japanese icebreaker, research and supply vessel of World War II and post-World War II. The unit was launched in February 1938. At the end of service the ship was 83.5 m long, 13.5 m wide and had a displacement of approximately 4,100 tons. The maximum speed was 12-13 knots. The Soya was originally built to order for the Soviet Union as a commercial vessel adapted to navigate northern waters, with floating ice. Its original name was Wołoczajewiec. However, due to political tensions on the Tokyo-Moscow line, the ship was not delivered to the customer, and the ship initially became the property of one of the Japanese shipping companies, which bore the name Chiryo Maru. In 1939, however, she was confiscated by the Navy and from 1940 (under the name Soya) served as a research and ammunition transport vessel. The ship happily survived the war and in 1950 was converted into Japan's first Arctic exploration vessel. In the period 1956-1962, the ship traveled on the Japan-Antarctic route, conducting research and delivering supplies to the Japanese polar base Showa (another name: Syowa). In 1978, the Soya was decommissioned and converted into a museum ship