D33417

REVELL

Revell 04166 Messerschmitt Me 262 A1a Scala 1/72

Revell 04166 Messerschmitt Me 262 A1a Scale 1/72. Plastic kit to assemble and colour, does not contain glue or colours. The Messerschmitt Me-262A Schwalbe (German: swallow) is a German twin-engine fighter-bomber with a metal structure in a low-wing configuration. The Me-262 was the first fighter jet in the history of aviation. The first flight with piston engines took place in 1941 and with turbojet engines on 18 July 1942. The first airframe design, designated P.1065, was presented in 1939 and, surprisingly, differed significantly from the final version. It was quickly decided to use oblique wings and test the airframe in flight with piston engines (Jumo210), which was successfully completed in 1941. Due to problems with the target power unit (BMW003 engine), the first jet flight on the Me-262 took place with Junkers Jumo004 engines. Interestingly, the Me-262 was structurally ready for serial production at the end of 1942. However, its entry into the line was significantly delayed. First, due to material shortages (especially shortages of tungsten and chromium), which forced technological changes, secondly, due to the failure of the BMW003 engines, and thirdly, due to Hitler's resistance to fact that the Me-262 was a fast bomber, not a fighter. As a result of all factors, the aircraft went online only in 1944! Given the already overwhelming Allied advantage in the air, the Me-262's shortage of fuel and trained crews could not have had a major impact on the course of the war. Undoubtedly, it was technologically superior to enemy aircraft, and the loss ratio was 1:9 in favor of the Me-262. A total of around 1,400 machines were built, but only around 300 entered service. Several development versions of this revolutionary aircraft were created: a bomber (A-2a), a reconnaissance fighter (A-1a / U3 and A-4a), a day fighter (A-1a) and a night fighter (B -1a / U1). Technical data (Me-262A-1a version): length: 10.6 m, wingspan: 12.6 m, height: 3.5 m, maximum speed: 900 km/h, rate of climb: 20 m/s, maximum range: 1050 km, maximum ceiling 11450 m, armament: fixed - 4 30 mm MK108 guns, underslung - 24 R4M rockets, 55 mm caliber, up to 1000 kg of bombs.

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