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REVELL ATLANTIC 1 "ITALIAN EAGLE" DASSAULT AVIATION - BREGUET - 03845 SCALA 1:72

Dassault-Breguet Atlantique 1 MPA. Atlantique is a long-distance maritime reconnaissance aircraft. It is produced in collaboration with European countries under the direction of the French aviation company Dassault-Breguet. It is a typical maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine aircraft. Serves in the armies of many NATO countries. Its crew of twelve can carry out missions lasting up to eighteen hours, over a distance of approximately 8,000 km. with an average speed of 315 km/h. Atlantique is the only aircraft specifically designed for this type of activity. All others were built from rebuilt civilian aircraft. Production took place at the following companies: Breguet and Sud Aviation in France, Fokker in the Netherlands, Dornier and Siebel in Germany, and SABCA and FN in Belgium. The order for the first copies was placed on June 6, 1963. There were 40 aircraft for France and 20 for Germany. Production of the ordered aircraft was completed at the end of 1968. Technical data: Maximum speed: 649 km/h, rate of climb: 14.7 m/s, maximum ceiling 9145 m, maximum range: 9075 km, armament: suspended - high at 3,500 kg load.

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REVELL TORNADO ASSTA 3.1 - 03842 SCALA 1:72

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REVELL TORNADO ASSTA 3.1 - 03842 SCALA 1:72

The origins of the Tornado design date back to 1968. It was then that the trinational PANAVIA consortium was formed to carry out the project known as MRCA (Multi-Role Combat Aircraft). On 14 September 1974 the flight of the first prototype took place and construction of the first 640 aircraft ordered began, with production being split so that Germany and Great Britain each completed 42.5% and Italy 15% of the total. order. Tornado fleets are currently the most important part of the aviation of three European NATO countries. They remain in the composition of the air forces of Great Britain (Royal Air Force), Italy (Italian Air Force) and Germany (Luftwaffe) and in the aviation of the German Navy (Marinefliege). Furthermore, in 1986, some of these aircraft were ordered by Saudi Arabia and incorporated into its armed forces (Royal Saudi Air Force). There are three main versions of the aircraft: Tornado ECR, Tornado ADV and Tornado IDS. Tornado ECR is a German/Italian reconnaissance version, it can carry Raytheon AGM - 88 HARM anti-radar missiles. Additionally, they carry AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles for self-defense purposes. The Tornado ADV is a version of the interceptor, equipped with the large Marconi-Ferranti Foxhunter radar with a range of up to 190 km and capable of tracking up to 20 targets simultaneously. The Tornado IDS, on the other hand, is an assault bomber designed primarily to support ground forces. It is capable of carrying a wide range of weapons, including: a CWS flying cartridge, Paveway II guided bombs, GBU-15 guided bombs, AGM-65 Maverick air-to-ground missiles. Technical data (ADV version): length: 18.68 m, wingspan (maximum): 13.91 m, height: 5.95 m, maximum speed: 2.27 mA, rate of climb: 77 m/s, ceiling practical: 21300 m, maximum range: 1850 km, armament: fixed - one 27 mm IWKA-Mauser cannon, suspended - up to 8500 kg load.
REVELL F-4J PHANTOM II - 03941 SCALA 1:72

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REVELL F-4J PHANTOM II - 03941 SCALA 1:72

The McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom is a long-range, twin-engine, two-seat multi-role fighter designed for operations in difficult weather conditions. The flight of the prototype took place on May 27, 1958, and series production began in 1961. Originally, the F-4 was intended only as a stormtrooper, but from 1955 onwards, design work went to meet the need of the Navy of the United States of a new fighter ship. The F-4 Phantom proved to be a very successful machine, produced in multiple versions, exported to many countries and produced under license. The first versions are models A to D intended for fighter-bombers. The next version is the F-4E, produced since 1967 as a long-range fighter. Reconnaissance versions were also created: RF-4B, ​​RF-4C and RF-4E. The latest versions are the F-4F and the F-4G Wild Weassel: these are electronic warfare aircraft and designed to combat enemy radars. The F-4 took part in the Vietnam War, conflicts in the Middle East (1967, 1973) and the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). In total, 5,057 F-4 Phantom aircraft were built. Technical data (F-4E version): Maximum speed: 2370 km/h, rate of climb: 210 m/s, maximum ceiling 18300 m, maximum range: 2600 km, armament: fixed - 1 M61A-1 20mm cannon, Suspended - up to 7255 kg of bombs and rockets.
REVELL JUNKERS JU 87 G/D TANK BUSTER - 04692 SCALA 1:72

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REVELL JUNKERS JU 87 G/D TANK BUSTER - 04692 SCALA 1:72

The Junkers Ju-87 Stuka (short for German Sturzkampfflugzeug, meaning dive bomber) is a German single-engine dive bomber with a classic tail, wings in an inverted gull-wing configuration, and all-metal construction. The Ju-87 is one of the most famous Luftwaffe aircraft, a symbol of its power alongside the Me-109. At the beginning of the war (1939-1941) it became a symbol of the Blitzkrieg, often causing panic among enemy soldiers by installing acoustic sirens (so-called jerychońskie trunks), which caused a specific sound during a dive flight. The creator of the machine was Hermann Pohlmann, and the Ju-87 first flew into the air in 1935, and went into production two years later. During the civil war in Spain, without encountering any serious enemy in the air, it was able to prove itself effective in the missions for which it was created. Due to the possibility of very steep dives, while maintaining a relatively low speed, it achieved a very high bombardment efficiency. Stuka's fame was confirmed during its activities in Poland, the Netherlands, France, Greece and Crete. However, during the Battle of Britain, slow Stukas with permanently mounted landing gear were simply massacred by RAF aircraft and, as a result, were delegated to attack less defended targets. On the Eastern Front, the Ju-87 served a role primarily as a close support aircraft and an excellent tank destroyer. Hans Ulrich Rudel - the Luftwaffe pilot, honored with the most awards, had destroyed 519 Soviet tanks on his behalf. During the war the production of the Ju-87 was suspended several times, but it always turned out that it had to be restarted because there were no other aircraft that could worthily replace it. During the war, a dozen versions and versions of the Ju-87 were created. The first mass-produced was the Ju-87 B (Berta). It was powered by two versions of the Jumo 211 engine with 1000 KM or 1200 KM. It served as a land-based dive bomber. In turn, the Ju-87R (Richard) was launched into attacks against naval targets. It had a longer range than the B version, but was a little slower. Version D (Dora) was the most widely produced and modified. They had new versions of the Jumo 211 engine with 1420 and 1500 hp. The Ju-87D featured better armor than its predecessors. The last large-scale version of the Ju 87 was the Model G (Gustav), an attack aircraft and "destroyer", which entered the line units in early 1943. The main weapons of this version were the two Bordkanone guns 37mm BK 3.7 mounted in trays under the wings. The Ju-87G also had improved armour. During the entire war, approximately 5,900 units of all versions of the Ju-87 were produced. Technical data (Ju-87B version): length: 11 m, wingspan: 13.8 m, height: 4.23 m, maximum speed: 390 km/h, maximum range: 500 km, maximum ceiling 8200 m, armament: fixed - 3 7.92 mm cal machine guns, suspended - up to 450 kg of bombs.
REVELL B-25 MITCHELL - EASY CLICK SYSTEM - 03650 - SCALA 1:72

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REVELL B-25 MITCHELL - EASY CLICK SYSTEM - 03650 - SCALA 1:72

The North American B-25 Mitchell is an American medium bomber from World War II. The B-25 is an all-metal high-wing airframe with three-point retractable landing gear and a twin-tail. Propulsion consisted of two Wright Cyclon engines with power from 1300 KM to 1850 KM, depending on the version. The flight of the prototype took place in 1940, and mass production began a year later. Numerous versions of this bomber were produced during the war, including the B-25G (with a 75 mm cannon in the bow of the hull), the B-25H (with a 75 mm cannon and 6 machine guns in the bow of the machine) and the B -25J (with 8 x 12.7 mm machine guns in the bow of the fuselage). B-25 aircraft fought primarily in the Pacific and Mediterranean basin. Some of them were handed over to Britain and the USSR under the Lend-Lease Agreement, where they made their combat debut at Stalingrad. The Polish 305 Squadron flew the B-25 since 1943. The B-25 was most famous for its bold and courageous bomb attack on Tokyo in April 1942 (the famous Doolittle raid). Technical data: Maximum speed: 442 km/h, rate of climb: 4 m/s, maximum ceiling 7,600 m, maximum range: 4,300 km, armament: permanent - depending on the version, from 4 to 12 12.7 Browning machine guns mm or combination of the 75 mm and km guns. suspended - up to 2700 kg of bombs.
REVELL SPITFIRE MK. VB SUPERMARINE - 03897 SCALA 1:72

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REVELL SPITFIRE MK. VB SUPERMARINE - 03897 SCALA 1:72

The Supermarine Spitfire is probably the most famous British fighter of the Second World War. It was an all-metal machine with a low-wing configuration, characteristic elliptical wings, a classic tail and retractable landing gear. The prototype flight took place on 5 March 1936. The Spitfire proved to be the RAF's wartime staple, which continued to perform well after the war, remaining in production for 10 years. The Spitfire's story began on the drawing board of RJ Mitchell, Supermarine's chief designer. The first machines went to RAF units in 1938, but when the Battle of Britain began in the summer of 1940, there were already 19 squadrons of modern fighters at the airfields - together with the slightly older Hurricanes of the Islands, 600 aircraft were standing defending. As hostilities expanded, the Spitfire saw service wherever the RAF operated in the Far East, North Africa and Italy, during the Normandy landings and fighting in France, and finally during the operation in Germany in 1945. For many Britons, it became a symbol of victory in World War II. This wonderful machine has at least a dozen production versions. The most important are, among others, the first series-produced Spitfire Mk.I powered by a 1030 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin II engine. It was this machine above all that made such an excellent contribution to the Battle of Britain. Many versions of this model were developed, including PR Mk IA (reconnaissance version) or PR.IG (armed reconnaissance version). Another interesting version was the Spitfire Mk.V with a 1440 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin 45 engine. Merlin 50 engines were also assembled later. Serial production of this version began in 1941 and was the RAF's response to the appearance of the Messerschmitt Bf-109F. Another very successful version is the Spitfire Mk.IX, powered by a Merlin 61 engine with a 4-bladed propeller. It was created as an opponent of the Focke-Wulf Fw-190 and was put into production at the end of 1941. This version was modified several times and, for example, in 1944 it got a new gyroscopic sight, an enlarged rudder or a different wing system. Another major version is the Spitfire Mk.XIV with a Rolls-Royce Griffon 61 engine and a five-bladed propeller. Serial production began in October 1943. One of the last series produced was the Mk.21 version. This version had a Griffon 61 engine, a heavily reinforced structure and sheath, the wings were lengthened, increasing their flight surface. Mass production began in March 1945. Technical data (Mk.XIV version): length: 9.14 m, wingspan: 11.23 m, height: 3.05 m, maximum speed: 717 km/h, speed of climb: 18.5 m/s, practical ceiling: 13,200 m, maximum range: 1815 km, armament: fixed - 4 x 7.7 mm machine guns and 2 x 20 mm Hispano Mk II cannons, suspended - up to 225 kg of bombs .