D33420

REVELL

REVELL B-25 MITCHELL - EASY CLICK SYSTEM - 03650 - SCALA 1:72

The North American B-25 Mitchell is an American medium bomber from World War II. The B-25 is an all-metal high-wing airframe with three-point retractable landing gear and a twin-tail. Propulsion consisted of two Wright Cyclon engines with power from 1300 KM to 1850 KM, depending on the version. The flight of the prototype took place in 1940, and mass production began a year later. Numerous versions of this bomber were produced during the war, including the B-25G (with a 75 mm cannon in the bow of the hull), the B-25H (with a 75 mm cannon and 6 machine guns in the bow of the machine) and the B -25J (with 8 x 12.7 mm machine guns in the bow of the fuselage). B-25 aircraft fought primarily in the Pacific and Mediterranean basin. Some of them were handed over to Britain and the USSR under the Lend-Lease Agreement, where they made their combat debut at Stalingrad. The Polish 305 Squadron flew the B-25 since 1943. The B-25 was most famous for its bold and courageous bomb attack on Tokyo in April 1942 (the famous Doolittle raid). Technical data: Maximum speed: 442 km/h, rate of climb: 4 m/s, maximum ceiling 7,600 m, maximum range: 4,300 km, armament: permanent - depending on the version, from 4 to 12 12.7 Browning machine guns mm or combination of the 75 mm and km guns. suspended - up to 2700 kg of bombs.

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REVELL SPITFIRE MK. VB SUPERMARINE - 03897 SCALA 1:72

REVELL

REVELL SPITFIRE MK. VB SUPERMARINE - 03897 SCALA 1:72

The Supermarine Spitfire is probably the most famous British fighter of the Second World War. It was an all-metal machine with a low-wing configuration, characteristic elliptical wings, a classic tail and retractable landing gear. The prototype flight took place on 5 March 1936. The Spitfire proved to be the RAF's wartime staple, which continued to perform well after the war, remaining in production for 10 years. The Spitfire's story began on the drawing board of RJ Mitchell, Supermarine's chief designer. The first machines went to RAF units in 1938, but when the Battle of Britain began in the summer of 1940, there were already 19 squadrons of modern fighters at the airfields - together with the slightly older Hurricanes of the Islands, 600 aircraft were standing defending. As hostilities expanded, the Spitfire saw service wherever the RAF operated in the Far East, North Africa and Italy, during the Normandy landings and fighting in France, and finally during the operation in Germany in 1945. For many Britons, it became a symbol of victory in World War II. This wonderful machine has at least a dozen production versions. The most important are, among others, the first series-produced Spitfire Mk.I powered by a 1030 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin II engine. It was this machine above all that made such an excellent contribution to the Battle of Britain. Many versions of this model were developed, including PR Mk IA (reconnaissance version) or PR.IG (armed reconnaissance version). Another interesting version was the Spitfire Mk.V with a 1440 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin 45 engine. Merlin 50 engines were also assembled later. Serial production of this version began in 1941 and was the RAF's response to the appearance of the Messerschmitt Bf-109F. Another very successful version is the Spitfire Mk.IX, powered by a Merlin 61 engine with a 4-bladed propeller. It was created as an opponent of the Focke-Wulf Fw-190 and was put into production at the end of 1941. This version was modified several times and, for example, in 1944 it got a new gyroscopic sight, an enlarged rudder or a different wing system. Another major version is the Spitfire Mk.XIV with a Rolls-Royce Griffon 61 engine and a five-bladed propeller. Serial production began in October 1943. One of the last series produced was the Mk.21 version. This version had a Griffon 61 engine, a heavily reinforced structure and sheath, the wings were lengthened, increasing their flight surface. Mass production began in March 1945. Technical data (Mk.XIV version): length: 9.14 m, wingspan: 11.23 m, height: 3.05 m, maximum speed: 717 km/h, speed of climb: 18.5 m/s, practical ceiling: 13,200 m, maximum range: 1815 km, armament: fixed - 4 x 7.7 mm machine guns and 2 x 20 mm Hispano Mk II cannons, suspended - up to 225 kg of bombs .
ZVEZDA RUSSIAN MULTIROLE FIGHTER MIG 1.44 – 7252 SCALA 1:72

ZVEZDA

ZVEZDA RUSSIAN MULTIROLE FIGHTER MIG 1.44 – 7252 SCALA 1:72

1/72 scale is ideal for model aircraft, military models and figures. This means that the model is 72 times smaller than the real object. For example, a 1/72 scale model airplane will measure 20cm in length if the real thing measures 14.4m (1440cm). The 1/72 scale figures measure approximately 2.5cm tall. Product type: Model airplanes To build a plastic model airplane, you will need some materials: - a cutter or cutting pliers - some modeling glue. You can also decide to paint it with brushes and model paints (acrylic or enamel paints, your choice). The model consists of several pieces to cut and assemble. Depending on the number of pieces, the time needed for construction will be more or less long. An instruction manual is included in the package.
ACADEMY SOPWITH CAMEL WWI FIGHTER – 12447 SCALA 1:72

ACADEMY

ACADEMY SOPWITH CAMEL WWI FIGHTER – 12447 SCALA 1:72

British wooden-frame fighter aircraft, the Sopwith Camel biplane of the First World War. The camel got its nickname from the "hump" in front of the pilot's cabin, which housed the machine guns. The Camel was the successor to the famous Sopwith Pup fighter. The first flight of the prototype took place in December 1916, and deliveries to the front units began in the summer of 1917. The first serial batches required great skill from the pilots and showed an asymmetry of flight characteristics, unheard of in other Allied machines. Over time, however, the Camel earned a reputation among riders as a very easy-handling, solid machine with a decent rate of climb. It was a worthy rival to the German machines from the Albatros or Fokker factories. Over the course of the war, several versions of the Camel were created. The most important are: F.1 - fighter, F.1.3 - night fighter, TF1 - trench fighter, 2F.1 - deck fighter. Thanks to the start of mass production by eight different aircraft factories, it was possible to produce up to 5,490 machines during the war. Technical data: Maximum speed: 185 km/h; rate of climb 5.5 m/s, maximum ceiling 6400 m, armament: two 7.7 mm Vickers machine guns, firing via a propeller. In the assault version, 7.7 mm Lewis machine guns.